Childproofing Against Electrocution Highly Recommended

Posted by Mel on 12/26/2012 to Childproof
Childproofing against electrocution is highly recommended for homes with children aged twelve and under. Exposure to low voltage electricity found in wall outlets and electrical cords are a proven danger to children of all ages, not just toddlers. Statistics show an alarming number of children annually injured and/or killed by accidental electrical shock which could be prevented with adequate childproofing of their environment.

NOT JUST FOR TODDLERS

Most parents are very conscious of electrical cords and outlets when toddlers are present in the home. It is an accepted fact that toddlers are well known for their curiosity and compelling need to stick something in any hole they find. The holes of electrical wall outlets are normally about eye level for these children and present them with holes to explore and fill, unless covered. Parents acknowledge this and are careful to keep the outlets covered or hidden from toddlers and crawling babies. As children get older though, many people relax their childproofing practices. Preschoolers and elementary school aged children are potentially higher risk for accidental electrical injuries.

ELECTRICAL INJURIES IN CHILDREN STATISTICS

The American Academy of Pediatrics has reported that statistics for electrical injuries in children aged 12 years and younger show wall outlets, electrical cords, extension cords and small electrical appliances as the culprits for the injuries. Reportedly, electrical cords and extension cords account for +63% of the injuries with 15% resulting from wall outlets and the remaining +20% from small electrical appliances. The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that 86% of the reported electrical injuries occurred in children aged 1-4.

An estimated 3900 injuries associated with accidental electrical shock are treated in emergency rooms annually according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Toddlers sticking metal objects into wall sockets resulting in burns to their fingers and hands account for approximately one third of the injuries. Other injuries resulting from exposure to electricity include children biting electrical wires, squirting water from water guns or squirt toys into wall sockets, small appliances and plugging or unplugging wires.

According to data reported by Marshall Brain in 2005, besides the children who are injured annually from electrical shock, approximately 100+ children die from accidental electrocution as a result of unprotected outlets.

CHILDPROOFING TECHNIQUES AND SUPPLIES

Various childproofing techniques and supplies are available for homes to help prevent accidental electrical injuries and/or death. Plastic electrical outlet covers can be placed into outlets eliminating those tempting holes toddlers wish to fill. Childproof electrical outlets, which are designed specifically to keep the prong holes covered, can be easily installed. Extension cords or tracks can be used which have available slots closed until an adult opens a slot to use it. Furniture can hide wall outlets and cords. Small appliances like hair dryers, space heaters, electric toothbrushes and razors should be placed out of children's reach.

Small, simple, precautionary measures can save a child's life and/or prevent serious injury. Childproofing against electrocution is highly recommended, easy to do with these techniques and very effective.

 Electrical
 Childproof

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